Posts

Schloss Lübben

Image
Well... Hi there, long time no post, I know. Truthfully yours truly was a bit castled out the last few weeks. I actually still visited a bunch of them - as always you can follow my latest adventures on Instagram - but with lots of other things going on, I just didn't feel like editing pictures, writing and everything else that goes into this tiny space on the world wide web. But with the big C-word holding all our lives in a tight grip at the moment, I thought that you and me both could use some escapism. And so in today's post, we are having a closer look at a castle I visited in the fall of last year. Schloss Lübben may not be the most visually remarkable castle featured on this blog but it definitely has the most curious castle tower of them all even beating the white tower of Schloss Bad Homburg. Frankly, you don't even really recognise it as a tower at first glance as it is an entirely separate building. (Can you spot it in the right photo above? Yep, that big buildin…

Schloss Cecilienhof

Image
Schloss Cecilienhof may be the youngest castle of the Hohenzollern dynasty and only slightly more than one hundred years old, but it still has a rich history to boast. From the residence of the last German Crown Prince and his family to the meeting place of Stalin, Truman and Churchill (later Attlee), it is quite a ride this palace has seen in the last 107 years. And while it is not Germany's youngest castle as I erroneously claimed earlier on, it is a thoroughly modern one, today's Hohenzollern wouldn't mind having an apartment at. As one does when one is Emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm II ordered the construction of Schloss Cecilienhof in 1912. The palace in the New Garden in Potsdam wasn't his first castle project though the one most close to home as the palace was intended as a residence for his oldest son and heir, Crown Prince Wilhelm, and his wife Cecilie, hence the name Cecilienhof (or Cecilie's court), as well as their children. With a construction cost of 1,498,0…

Schloss Lindstedt

Image
Just a stone's throw away from the Neues Palais and the adjoining Park Sanssouci yet far off the beaten tourist tracks lies perhaps the least known of Potsdam's plentiful palaces. Frankly, yours truly had never heard of it before the recently publicised Hohenzollern restitution debate. But you know me, once I hear of a palace in my vicinity, there is hardly any stopping this Castleholic. Today an event location, you can stroll around its park any (day) time.  It was in 1828 that King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia purchased a small country estate mainly used for carp breeding from the noble Bülow family. His oldest son and successor, the future Friedrich Wilhelm IV, took an immediate interest in the estate. For decades following the purchase, the Crown Prince and later King drew up over 100 plans to reshape a Baroque building located on the estate into a small but magnificent palace in Neo-Classical style. Architects commissioned to submit plans for the new structure includ…

Schloss Oranienburg

Image
You would be forgiven to think that a castle named Oranienburg would be located somewhere in the Netherlands or at least the area in Germany where the the Dutch royal family's ancestors hail from. Located in the city of the same name just north of Berlin, Schloss Oranienburg does indeed have a Dutch connection even though it's located far away from the Netherlands. Originally the settlement was known by its Slavic name Bothzowe and later Germanised as Bötzow. At least two other castles, a fortified one and a hunting lodge, were located on the same site previously.  As the story goes, it was in 1650 that Elector Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia, who later became known as the Great Elector, and his first wife Luise Henriette of Nassau, granddaughter of Willem of Orange, visited the area on a hunting trip. The young electress was immediately taken by the landscape as it reminded her of her home, the Netherlands. Later that same year, Friedrich Wilhelm gifted his wife with the Bötzow…