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Schloss Callenberg

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Schloss Callenberg is the third of the four famous Coburg castles we are covering here on Confessions of a Castleholic, after Schloss Ehrenburg and Schloss Rosenau. While all of them were once the property of the Dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Schloss Callenberg is the last of the castle to be owned (or rather owned again) by the family that was once perhaps even more famous for their marriage alliances than for their little Dukedom located on the edge of the Thuringian Forest.  While firstly mentioned in the 13th century as the property of a member of the Chalwinberch family, the castle was later sold to the Bishopric of Würzburg and given as a fiefdom to the Counts of Henneberg and Knights of Sternberg at different points in history. It was during the course of the 16th century, that Schloss Callenberg came into the possession of the Dukes of Saxe-Coburg. It was Duke Johann Casimir who acquired the castle following the death of the last male heir of the Sternberg family as an open …

Jagdschloss Paulinzella

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The Principality of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt may just be the least known of all the German states that, more than a century ago, made up the Kaiserreich, even though it did exist up until the very end when the monarchies in Germany were abolished in 1918. It had its own Prince, Günther Victor was his name, and naturally also its own castles. While all fairly little known, Schloss Heidecksburg may just be one of the ultimate insider's tips when it comes to German castles (and I'll promise you, we will get it to it here at Castleholic very soon). But first, let's have a look at Jagdschloss Paulinzella. The nearby hunting lodge of the Princes of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt is located right next to the ruins of the much better known Paulinzella Abbey, one of the most important Romanesque structures in Germany.  Unfortunately, fairly little seems to be known about the history of the Renaissance-style Jagdschloss (at least online as I did not visit the museum about the monastery and h…

Bürglass-Schlösschen

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Continuing our run of Coburg's plentiful palaces in the past couple of weeks is the Bürglass-Schlösschen. (Schlösschen meaning little palace though while not massive in size, nobody ever had to squeeze in to fit, I'm pretty certain.) It most famously served as the residence of Tsar Ferdinand I of Bulgaria during his years of exile until his death in 1948 though its connection with the Saxe-Coburg and Gotha family goes back a few centuries further. 
After previous buildings on the same site had been and had not been owned by the family at different points in time, Prince Friedrich Josias of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld purchased the small estate near the ducal residence Schloss Ehrenburg in 1794. Friedrich Josias had been a general in the Austrian army but resigned following a dispute with Austrian policymakers and retired to Coburg. After only ten months of construction, he was able to move into his new residence. After Friedrich Josias' death in 1815, his palace came into the po…

Schloss Hohenfels

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Never heard of Schloss Hohenfels in Coburg? You are excused, neither had I before doing some research for my latest castle adventure to the residential town of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. And you would still be excused if you hadn't heard of it even if you have visited as well for the Schloss is  located rather on the outskirts of the city and also today a school. Its origins are very royal though. In 1837, Duke Ernst Alexander of Württemberg, younger brother of Duchess Marie of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, wife of Ernst II, commissioned architect Balthasar Harres, a student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel, to draw up plans for a residential palace for himself. After Harres left Coburg a year later, it was Vincenz Fischer-Birnbaum who finished the construction on the Classicist Schloss. Duke Ernst Alexander later fell in love and married opera singer Natalie Eschborn a.k.a. Frassini a.k.a. Baroness of Grünhof. His brother-in-law Duke Ernst II had persuaded her to come and sing in Coburg and Erns…

Palais Edinburgh

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Palais Edinburgh? You would be excused for thinking that you need to travel somewhere in the United Kingdom, particularly Scotland, to find a palace with such a name. However, this little gem is actually to be found in Germany - or Coburg, to be more specific. Coburg, of course, is well connected to the British royal family due to a couple of 19th century marriages, most famously that of Queen Victoria and Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. It is also through one of their sons that this little palace received its name though its origins go back a little bit further. It was Baron Karl August of Wangenheim who built the palace between 1845 and 1846 facing the ducal residence Schloss Ehrenburg. The Baron of Wangenheim, however, could only enjoy his new residence, at the time known as Palais Wangenheim or (Wangenheimsches Palais), for a handful of years as he passed in 1850.  In 1865, Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, the second son of Victoria and Albert and heir to his childless uncle Duk…

Schloss Ehrenburg

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There is a first time for everything: And of course Schloss Ehrenburg obviously wasn't my first time visiting a castle but it was first time I scored private castle tour. Where exactly? In Coburg at 9am on a weekday - turns out getting up early does pay off sometimes (and this Castleholic certainly is no natural morning person)! And the best thing? I think Schloss Ehrenburg would have even been the Coburg castle I had picked for a private castle tour if I would have had the choice, I just love it and its lovely mixture of Baroque and Empire/Classicist styles, two of my favourites. Sadly, you aren't allowed to take pictures of the interior - I'll never figure out in which Bavaria-based palaces you are (not) allowed to - and so a gazillion pictures of the exterior of the former residence of the Dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha will need to do.  Schloss Ehrenburg was built starting in 1543 on the basis of a former Franciscan monastery under Duke Johann-Ernst of Saxe-Coburg. Int…

Schloss Rosenau

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"Were I not what I am, this would be my real home", Queen Victoria once wrote about Schloss Rosenau. While this little castle near Coburg may only have a dozen or two rooms, it might just be the most famous one of them all. Why? It is the birthplace of Coburg's most famous son, the man who would go on to become the husband of the most powerful woman in the world at the time and receive the title Prince Consort, Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. This history of Schloss Rosenau, however, goes back much further than this 19th century love story (or whatever you call it when two people actually get along well after an arranged marriage).  Schloss Rosenau was first mentioned in a document in 1439 as a possession of the Lords of Rosenawe. They remained the owners of the Schloss for a hundred years or so until heavy debts forced them to sell the castle to Duke Johann Casimir of Saxe-Coburg during the 16th century. Even though they managed the reacquire the castle once more, it w…