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Lingnerschloss

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Time to get back to my pre-Easter castle adventures and introduce you to another castle I saw while visiting beautiful Dresden: Lingnerschloss literally located right next to Schloss Albrechtsberg. Originally known as Villa Stockhausen, the Schloss was built by Prince Albrecht of Prussia, youngest brother of both King Friedrich Wilhelm IV und the future Emperor Wilhelm I, for his chamberlain Johann Karl Friedrich Ludwig von Stockhausen. Prince Albrecht had to leave the Prussian court after morganatically marrying Rosalie von Rauch and made Dresden his new home.  The Villa was built between 1850 and 1853 according to plans by Adolf Lohse, a student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel who had also given Schloss Albrechtsberg its current appearance. The chamberlain, however, could not enjoy the castle for very long as he died in the year of completion. His family continued to live there though. In 1891, Villa Stockhausen was sold to sewing machine manufacturer Bruno Naumann zu Königsbrück, who d…

Beyond Castles: 9 Magnificent Temples to Visit in Angkor

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If you were to compile a list of the modern wonders of the world, it would probably be hard to miss Angkor Wat, the largest temple of the former capital city of the Khmer Empire. When people (including yours truly before her trip) say that they are "visiting Angkor Wat", they really mean that they will be visiting Angkor Archaeological Park. While Angkor Wat is the most famous of all of Angkor's temples, there are hundreds and thousands more scattered in its vicinity, from small ruins to some of the largest temple structures in the world - and even if it means going beyond castles, they are just too impressive to not share them here on Castleholic.  Angkor Wat Angkor Wat literally means "Capital Temple", and - measuring 162.6 hectares - Cambodia's national symbol, you may also recognise from the country's flag, is the biggest religious structure in the world. While its sunrise isn't as romantic and breathtaking as usually described (not least due to…

Rittergut Remeringhausen

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It’s kinda surprising I introduced you to the concept of a Rittergut only about a week ago considering that there are hundreds and thousands of them scattered all over the German countryside. A Rittergut, literally a knight’s estate, were usually and often still are owned by the untitled or occassionally lower titled nobility. Today’s knight’s estate - Rittergut Remeringhausen - owes its existence to the Münchhausen family, you may recall from one of the other times they popped up here on Castleholic. In 1565, Börries von Münchhausen inherited a feudal estate in Remeringhausen, alongside with another one in nearby Oldendorf, from his father-in-law Claus van Büschen and, in turn, later bequeathed it to his son Ludolph. It was Ludolph who, in 1594, turned the farm run by a serf into an estate run directly for the family and decided to build a manor house to rival other knight's estates. Only one wing of the Weser-Renaissance-style building dating to the year 1599 remains to his day…

CastleMemory: Schloss Bückeburg

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Today's CastleMemory is a bit of a different one. It is a castle I did not visit years and years ago in the day before this blog but last weekend: Schloss Bückeburg where there was an Indian-themed market going on. To learn more about the history of the stunning residence of the Princes of Schaumburg-Lippe, check out our previous post.

Schloss Haddenhausen

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While some castles are knight's manors, not all knight's manors are called castles. Schloss Haddenhausen near Minden falls into the former category and it sometimes also referred to as Rittergut Haddenhausen, but as I'm a Castleholic and not a manorholic we will conveniently go with the name that includes Schloss. The origins of of this knight's estate today owned by the Barons of Bussche-Haddenhausen date back a good 800 years. 
Haddenhausen was firstly mentioned in 1254, when the Bishop of Minden purchased the estate. In 1385, it was given as a fiefdom by Bishop Gerhard II of Minden to Ludolf von Mönnichhausen, an ancestor of that Münchhausen who became famous as the Baron of Lies. Almost 100 years later, the estate was largely destroyed during a feud between the Bishops of Minden and neighbouring Osnabrück. It was later rebuilt by the Münchhausen family who, in the meantime, had became the manor's owner.  During the Reformation, key members of the Münchhausen f…

Neues Fürstliches Palais (Bückeburg)

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When we think of castles, we tend to think of museums or noble homes - but some of them are used in rather modern way: From court buildings to hotels or - as in today's case - a school. The Neues Fürstliches Palais (New Princely Palace), also simply known as Palais or Herminen-Palais for its first resident, in Bückeburg as been home to a vocational college for close to 60 years now. It's origins are very princely though. Bückeburg was, of course, the capital of the Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe, one of the smallest states of German Empire, and remains the home of the Schaumburg-Lippe family to this day. Their main residence is Schloss Bückeburg, a few minutes walk away from the Neues Palais. Like rulers tend to do at some point in their life, Prince Adolf I Georg wished for a new additional palace for him and his family. In 1882, he commissioned architect Hermann Schaedtler to draw up plans for a Neues Palais. Likely many changes were made to the plans for the Neo-Renaissa…

Bang Pa-In Palace

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Whenever I am on holiday, I usually try to avoid tour group tours as much as possible. I'm just not a fan of the "Get out of the bus and hurry, we only have 15 minutes at this place!" kind of travel. One of the tours during my recent travels in Thailand though did lead me to a royal palace I had never heard about and I can thus share with you today. North of Bangkok and close to the old capital of Ayutthaya lies Bang Pa-In Palace. Nestled away in a traditional Thai small town, the palace complex and former summer residence of the royal family of Siam and later Thailand boasts a surprising number of European-style looking buildings and some of the statues could have been taken straight from Versailles.  Bang Pa-In Palace owes is existence to King Prasat Thong, who ruled Siam between 1629 and 1656. Legend has it that he was an illegitimate son of King Ekathotsarot, who was shipwrecked on the island in the Chao Praya River and had a child by a local woman. Other sources in…